Courses and Timetables

INTRODUCTORY COURSES

Students who wish to major/double major in Politics and Public Administration must successfully complete POLI1003 in semester I or II.

Unless otherwise specified, the final grading for each course will be determined by performance in the examination and assessment of coursework in a ratio to be announced by individual course instructors at the beginning of each semester.

POLI1003. Making sense of politics (6 credits)

It is an introductory course offered to students with no previous background in political science. It covers the basic concepts, institutions and processes that one would encounter in the study of politics. Emphasis will be placed on the application of concepts to current issues, including (but not restricted to) that of Hong Kong .

Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination

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ADVANCED COURSES

Unless otherwise specified, the final grading for each course will be determined by performance in the examination and assessment of coursework in a ratio to be announced by individual course instructors at the beginning of each semester.

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Compulsory course

POLI2104. Research methods in politics and public administration (6 credits)

Political scientists use a variety of methods to describe and explain political phenomena. Each method has its own purposes, assumptions, and limitations. This course covers the methods most commonly used in the study of politics and policies. Topics include the nature of scientific inquiry; measurement and causal inference; the conduct of case studies and field research; the design of surveys and experiments; the description and analysis of data; and research ethics. The course has a practical bent: its goal is to equip students with a working knowledge to put the methods to actual use.

Assessment: 100% coursework

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Gateway courses

POLI2105. Introduction to comparative politics (6 credits)

This course introduces students to a thematic approach in understanding politics in comparative settings. Drawing upon examples from liberal democracies, illiberal democracies and authoritarian states, the course examines the characteristics of the main political institutions and processes of the states, including political culture, political participation, the media, political parties, elections, the legislatures and executives. It compares how the various types of states govern, the types of political goods they can probably deliver and their drawbacks. Overall, it explores which way(s) is the best, and if democracy is universally applicable.


Assessment: 100% coursework

POLI2106. Introduction to international relations (6 credits)

In this course students will be introduced to the central concepts in, and theoretical approaches to, the study of world politics both in historical and contemporary contexts. The first five classes will focus on the evolution of world politics as well as the concepts and predominant theoretical approaches used by students of international relations to understand and explain the field. The course then will explore specific issues in international relations. These include: the study of foreign policy and decision‐making; international ethics; international economy; causes of conflict, war and peace; new security issues; and issues of global governance. Throughout the course students will be challenged to think critically about world politics and hone specific academic skills. The course provides a foundation for further study in world politics.

Assessment: 100% coursework

POLI2107. Introduction to political theory (6 credits)

This course addresses some of the fundamental questions in the field of political theory, including: Why should we obey the law? Who should rule us? What rights and liberties should citizens have? How should property be distributed? By addressing these and other questions, the course provides students with a broad introduction to the major concepts in Western political theory, such as authority, democracy, liberty, rights, equality, and justice.

This is a “gateway” course, and it is recommended that students complete this course before enrolling in any other political theory classes.

Assessment: 100% coursework

POLI2108. Introduction to public administration (6 credits)

The purpose of this gateway course is to introduce students to the fundamental concepts and theories of public administration. Students will gain an overview of both issues and practices related to the public administration. The course focuses on the traditions, environment, politics, and core functions of public administration.


Assessment: 60% coursework, 40% examination


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Capstone courses

POLI4092. Capstone experience: research internship in politics and public administration (6 credits)

Students will have the opportunity to perform basic research under the supervision of a faculty member. The internship includes meeting individually with the supervisor, reading relevant materials, assisting in an ongoing empirical research project, and writing an internship report.

Assessment: 100% coursework

POLI4109. Capstone experience: directed project in politics and public administration (6 credits)

Students will do an empirical research project on a specific topic under a teacher’s supervision. The project involves meeting with the supervisor, reading relevant theoretical and empirical articles, conducting empirical research projects, and writing a project report.

Assessment: 100% coursework

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Elective courses

POLI3001. Special topics in political science: The Middle East and North Africa in International Relations (6 credits)

This course introduces students to basic problems concerning the international politics of the Middle East and North Africa (MENA). Proceeding topically, it combines a historical perspective with a discussion of IR theory. Topics covered include: the role of oil, the Cold War, the making of ideology (esp. nationalism and Islamic Fundamentalism), lack of economic development, the Arab-Israeli conflict. Historically, this course deals with the contemporary period, focusing on the Cold War and beyond. In using the conceptual toolbox of IR, we will also discuss whether predominant IR perspectives help or hinder an adequate understanding of how MENA is integrated into international politics.

Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination.

POLI3002. Special topics in political theory (6 credits)

This course will focus on some major topics in political theory. Specific titles and course descriptions are available in the department website.

Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination

POLI3005. Capitalism and social justice (6 credits)

This course aims to analyse the concept of social justice, and examine which economic system might best achieve it. The positions to be assessed span the political spectrum, including the modern liberalism of John Rawls, the classical liberalism of F. A. Hayek, Robert Nozick’s libertarianism, John Stuart Mill’s utilitarianism, and contemporary defences of socialism. The course will engage with debates about the status of economic liberties within liberal theory, exploitation and sweatshop labour, and the extent that state intervention in economic production is necessary and desirable within society.

Assessment: 100% coursework

POLI3010. Democracy and its critics (6 credits)

This course aims to explore a set of important issues about the theory and practice of democracy. The first part of the course will examine the challenge of meritocracy and various justifications of democracy, including those offered by Mill, Rousseau, Schumpeter, and others. The second part will address some of the most pressing problems facing liberal democracies today: how to improve the quality of public deliberation in the age of social media? How to overcome the challenges posed by populism? How to maintain the efficacy of democratic institutions in a global capitalist economy?

Assessment: 100% coursework

POLI3015. Ethics and public affairs (6 credits)

This course examines major yet controversial public policies in contemporary societies from the perspectives of ethics and political theory. It is a course that connects public policy-making and ethics; it is a course that teaches students the significance of policy analysis in ethical perspectives. Topics covered may include but not be limited to the following policy areas: public health policies; national security; economic-finance policies; education policies; and land policies. Students are strongly recommended to complete POLI2107 or CCHU9009 before taking this course.

Assessment: 100% coursework

POLI3019. Hong Kong and the world (6 credits)

Hong Kong's international character has been vital to its prosperity and vitality. While Hong Kong's ‘foreign affairs portfolio’ is controlled by China, Hong Kong retains considerable autonomy in shaping its international destiny. What global course should Hong Kong leaders chart? This class will examine the Special Administrative Region's unique international status, its complex identity as a Chinese world city and its track record in facing the challenges and opportunities associated with today's highly interdependent global system.

Assessment: 100% coursework

POLI3020. Hong Kong politics (6 credits)

This course focuses on the legal, political and institutional structure of the Hong Kong government. The political culture and attitudes of the Hong Kong people are discussed. Other topics include the Chief Executive, legislative politics, constitutional politics, public opinion, pressure groups, political parties, mass media, and Beijing's policy toward Hong Kong.

Assessment: 100% coursework

POLI3022. Contemporary Chinese politics (6 credits)

This course is an introduction to contemporary Chinese politics. The main objective is to understand the ideology, institutions and processes of the contemporary Chinese political system and explore the socio-economic consequences, achievements, and problems of socialism with Chinese characteristics.

Assessment: 60% coursework, 40% examination

POLI3023. Special Topics in Chinese politics: China’s adaptive authoritarianism (6 credits)

This course enables students to appreciate and develop an in-depth understanding of the unique dynamics between the formal political constraints of China’s one-party rule and its remarkable adaptive capacity to govern. There are no prerequisites. The course draws implications from the paradox of political expectations and limitations while critically evaluating the trends, patterns and challenges which ultimately determine the state capacity of the one-party regime. To train students for a broader view, this course will also put China in a comparative perspective, comparing China’s past and present, as well as China with other major governing systems. Using an inter-disciplinary approach, primary issues to be explored include: the evolving dynamics of formal political systems and the adaptive and innovative methods of governance in contemporary China; the functions of law and implications of developing law-based governance; revision of civil service management mechanisms; corruption and anticorruption efforts; disaster management; nuanced methods of handling social demands and unease in the era of information revolution; and China’s role in global governance.

Assessment: 60% coursework, 40% examination

POLI3024. Special topics in public administration: institutional analysis for reform (6 credits)

Public policies and management do not take place in a vacuum. It is essential for public managers to possess a good awareness and understanding of their embedded political context. The course applies various institutional approaches to understand systematically the political-institutional structures and processes in which public policies and management are practiced and major reforms take place. The course will draw on theories and practices developed by both academics and practitioners as its learning resources. This is an advanced undergraduate–level course.

Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination

POLI3025. Managerial skills in public organizations (6 credits)

This course focuses on the activities and functions of managers in public organizations. Emphasis is put on the environment and context within which public managers operate, and the various managerial skills and tools that are essential to effective public managers. Students are expected to acquire skills to manage conflicts, lead, manage resources, communicate, and make decisions in the context of public organizations. Reference is made to the experiences in various public or non-profit organizations in Hong Kong.

Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination

POLI3027. The public policy-making process: theories and application (6 credits)

This course reviews major theories of the public policy process and considers the practical implications for the key challenges in politics and governance. These theories offer interesting insights into why certain issues enter the policy agenda while others remain excluded, how institutions are set up to regulate activities in policymaking, and what arrangements can lead to material improvement in policy responsiveness. Students are encouraged to address issues highlighted by the theories using real-world, comparative cases.

Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination

POLI3031. Politics of economic reform in China (6 credits)

This course examines the politics of economic reform in contemporary China. After a brief historical review of the planning era, we study various aspects of China’s economic transition after 1978, with a special focus on the economic and political tradeoffs behind each reform program. In the first half of the semester, we will cover areas such as the rural transformation, the enterprise reform, the reform of the fiscal system, trade and foreign direct investment policies, and the reform of the financial system. In the second half of the semester, we will discuss issues related to the current landscape of China’s political economy, including income inequality, political governance, environmental protection and other challenges.

Assessment: 60% coursework, 40% examination

POLI3034. Public administration in China (6 credits)

This course aims to examine the context, structure, people and important issues in managing the public sector in contemporary China. The course provides students a basic understanding of China’s public administration system and its reforms. Several very important topics will be covered, including the relationship between the Party and the government, government structure and intergovernmental relations, and how to manage public employees, and key issues in policy-making and implementation in contemporary China. This course encourages students to conduct group project, which will allow students to learn public policy analysis targeting real hot issues unfolding during China’s reform era. Sample policy areas include food safety management, waste management and crisis management. The newly emerged modes of public service delivery in China will also be discussed.

Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination

POLI3035. Public administration in Hong Kong (6 credits)

This course covers coordination, budgetary allocation and civic engagement, and civil service management in the Hong Kong government. We will discuss how practices in these domains have changed in recent years as well as what administrative traditions continue to shape civic service today. Apart from academic research, we offer students opportunities to make real-world contributions through participation in local community initiatives for open data and in the creation of public administration literature for open-content platforms.

Assessment: 100% coursework

POLI3037. Managing people in public organizations (6 credits)

This course seeks to improve students’ capacities to analyze and interpret the context, institutions, processes and key issues in the management of people in public organizations with special reference to Hong Kong from the perspective of agency theory. There are two guest lectures offered by public managers. By the end of the course, students should be able to critically evaluate the control and accountability problems involved in managing the public sector work force and strategies to overcome them. Students should also be able to analyze and evaluate cases in public sector human resource management.

Assessment: 60% coursework, 40% examination

POLI3039. Public policy analysis (6 credits)

This is an introductory course to public policy analysis with an emphasis on the production of advice for decision-makers. This course builds foundations of public policy analysis by covering related theories and concepts. Having answered why we need government intervention in solving public policy problems, this course also seeks to equip students with skills and techniques to analyze, design, and assess policy options.

Assessment: 100% coursework

POLI3040. Public sector management (6 credits)

Public administration is conducted through a variety of public organizations and institutional arrangements that collectively constitute the public sector. This course aims to provide students an understanding on the key issues of public sector management. It is structured into four parts: (1) the scope and structure of public sector, including the features and operation of various types of public organizations; (2) the human resource management issues within public organizations; (3) various modes of public service delivery; and (4) public sector reform strategies. Reference is made to the experience in Hong Kong.

Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination

POLI3044. United States politics (6 credits)

American politics frequently captivates domestic and international audiences. However without a better understanding of key aspects of the American political system and its political dynamics it may sometimes be difficult to develop a good understanding of the political events occurring in it – or the United States various domestic and international policies. The purpose of this course is to provide students with such an introduction to American politics. Students will learn about the key aspects of American political system, the formal (executive, judiciary, and legislative) and informal (bureaucracy, media, interest groups, etc.) branches of government, its creation and development into its present form, the way officials at various branches and levels are selected, the contours of American federalism, how domestic policy is done and some of the main issues that animate its domestic political debates.

Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination

POLI3047. United States foreign policy (6 credits)

This course will discuss a key aspect of American foreign policy- the various ways in which the U.S. government tries to influence developments within other states by intervening in their domestic affairs. The goal of this course is to provide a better understanding of such interventions in general and a more complete picture of this frequently neglected aspect of American foreign policy in particular. Accordingly this course will focus on explaining, among other things, why interventions of various types are done, their effectiveness in achieving their goals and their effects on the target and others. It will also discuss various historical cases of American interventions in-depth ranging from the early 20th century to the present, widening the depth and breadth of student knowledge on American foreign policy. The course will cover both military and non-military forms of interventions including (for example): military interventions in civil wars, FIRCs/regime change operations, partisan electoral interventions, economic sanctions, and drone warfare.

Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination.

POLI3051. Issues in Chinese political philosophy (6 credits)

A comparative study of Chinese and Western political philosophy, with special emphasis on Confucianism and liberalism. Topics include the nature of classical Confucian political thought, the developments of the Confucian traditions in response to local political changes and to the challenges presented by western liberalism, the contemporary discourse on Confucianism and human rights, freedom, and democracy, and other related issues. Reference will be made to Chinese materials.

Assessment: 100% coursework

POLI3052. International relations of East Asia (6 credits)

This course helps students to have a better understanding of major trends and issues in international relations of East Asia. Instead of providing a comprehensive survey of the history, culture, and national policies of countries in the region, it mainly addresses four issues in the course: What are major trends in regional IR? What is the source of conflict in the region? What are the common interests that unite peoples and states of East Asia? How does the region organize itself? It explains dynamics and patterns of regional international relations in a broad geopolitical and geoeconomic context. Topics in discussion include major powers’ role in the region, the Korean Peninsula, the Taiwan Strait, ASEAN, Southeastern Asia and regional institution-building.

Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination.

POLI3059. China and the world (6 credits)

In this course we investigate several important puzzles about China in international politics: Can earlier periods of China’s history help us understand its contemporary foreign policies? What does China’s economic transformation since 1978 mean for the global economy? Will the United States and China successfully accommodate each other, or will the coming years be defined by friction and conflict? Do China's military, political, and economic activities abroad threaten or complement the interests of other states and societies? This course examines these questions by surveying classic and recent research on China’s historical and contemporary foreign relations. In doing so, it considers China in the context of broader theories in international relations. It also introduces students to different social science research approaches including qualitative case studies, archival research, survey experiments, and large-N statistical analyses. The first third of the course focuses on historical Chinese foreign relations. The remaining two thirds turn to contemporary issues in the study of Chinese foreign policy.

Assessment: 100% coursework.

POLI3061. Hong Kong and South China: the political economy of regional development and cooperation (6 credits)

The growing integration between Hong Kong and South China has profound implications not only for this region, but also for China and Asia as a whole. This course aims to analyze such an important development and its many implications. It is divided into three parts. Part I offers an overview of the development of the South China region. Theoretical approaches in the study of regionalism, intergovernmental relations and globalization and their relevance for understanding South China will also be examined. Part II analyzes the social, economic and political links between Hong Kong and Greater China and the development experience of South China since the late 1970s. Part III will focus on several key issues in regional development and cooperation in the South China region, including intergovernmental cooperation mechanisms, economic and technological development, demographic flows, boundary control, transportation and infra-structural development, as well as environmental management.

Assessment: 60% coursework, 40% examination.

POLI3064/LLAW3080. Governance and law (6 credits)

This course seeks to understand why the state regulates certain activities and behaviour in society, what different forms of regulation exist, when and what kind of legal regulation is deemed necessary, how legal regulation is enforced, and checks balances against abuse in enforcement. This course is jointly taught by staff from the Department of Politics and Public Administration and the Department of Law. The main objective of the course is to explore the interface between the study of Politics and Law in understanding governance. Relevant case studies will be included for illustration and discussion.

Assessment: 50% examination, 30% research paper, 20% group project presentation.

In 2020-21 (2nd semester): This course will be taught online by zoom, with regular follow-up individual and small group discussions with course participants by zoom or skype.

POLI3065. Public organization and management (6 credits)

This course examines theories of organization for understanding organizational phenomena and discusses potential strategies for enhancing organizational performance. The class draws on studies and practices of organizations from different sectors as learning materials. Emphasis is placed on the application of theory to various organizational settings including public, private and nonprofit organizations. Through exposing students to various streams of organization literature, the course aims to develop students’ ability to understand systematically and analyze critically organizational phenomena. By the end of the semester, students will be equipped with some basic tools for improving organizational performance.

Assessment: 100% coursework

POLI3067. Sex, drugs, and the limits of liberalism (6 credits)

The purpose of this course is to explore a set of fundamental issues about the proper scope of personal freedom and the power of the state. We will discuss questions such as: can the state permissibly interfere with your liberty, for your own good? Is it wrong to prohibit the consumption of pleasurable drugs? Should the state nudge you to make healthier lifestyle choices? Can the state ever permissibly prohibit sexual relations between consenting adults? Should state laws and policies be neutral between different views of what makes life worthwhile? Is it wrong that we all have to pay for public art, museums, and culture through general taxation, regardless of whether we think they are valuable? The course aims to assess the strengths and limits of liberalism by examining the arguments for and against the liberal views on these issues.

Assessment: 100% coursework

POLI3075/LLAW3142. Law and politics of constitutions (6 credits)

Almost all modern states are constitutional states in the sense that they, in one form or the other, have a constitution. A constitution is not only a legal document; it is also a political instrument.
For what purpose was the constitution made; for what functions could it serve; and on which it can be sustained are questions that cannot be answered without considering the interaction between law and politics in the making, implementation and development of the constitution.
This course applies an interdisciplinary approach and a comparative perspective to analyze intertwining issues of law and politics concerning constitutions like: constitutional interpretation theories, the roles of political parties, religion, judiciary and the public in the constitutional processes, and the significance of dialogue in constitutional deliberation.

Assessment: 50% open book examination, 30% research paper, 20% group project presentation

POLI3076. Special topics in international relations: International politics of development (6 credits)

The developing world has been highly marginalized yet strategically critical in international politics throughout modern history. This course examines the intersection of international politics and development in three parts: the major development bottlenecks faced by developing countries; the role of powerful states and international institutions in the developing world; and several new frontiers in international development including the rise of “emerging donors,” Chinese development finance, and the post-COVID development landscape. The course will familiarize students with a wide range of political science, economics, history, and other social science research on global development. It will also introduce students to a diverse set of research methods for political science and international relations.

Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination

POLI3077. Special topics in comparative politics: democratization (6 credits)

Since the 1970s, many countries in Europe, Latin America, Asia and Africa have transformed from authoritarian to democratic regimes. Studies show that from 1975 to 2005, there was a threefold increase in the number of democratic countries. On the other hand, many newly democratized countries have reverted back to hybrid regime or full authoritarianism. Other countries have attempted but failed to democratize altogether. Why have some countries succeeded in democratization while others failed? Among those that succeeded, how did democratization occur? What are the crucial factors affecting democratic consolidation? For those that persist as hybrid regimes, what are their characteristics and what explains their endurance? This course will examine these issues critically through both generalized discussion of the structural, institutional, and societal factors affecting democratization as well as country-based studies.

Assessment: 100% coursework

POLI3079. Global justice (6 credits)

This course provides an introduction into some of the main issues in the field of global justice, such as legitimacy and authority in international politics, self-determination, human rights, global distributive justice and the normative relations between the rich and the poor, the significance of borders, and immigration

Assessment: 100% coursework

POLI3080. Global political economy (6 credits)

This course explores the political dimensions of global economic relations. The objectives of this course are to give students a better appreciation of major problems and dilemmas of contemporary global economy and to provide a conceptual framework for addressing policy problems in the global economy. We begin by examining several contending perspectives on global political economy. The course then examines distinct issue areas: globalization, development, trade, capital flows, financial crises, multinational production, environmental degradation, world hunger, and the transnational movement of people.

Assessment: 60% coursework, 40% examination

POLI3093. Understanding social protest (6 credits)

From Hong Kong’s political demonstration on July 1st to the protest rally organized by your student union, social protest is undoubtedly an important form of politics. Outside of the formal and institutionalized channels, people do take politics onto the streets and use disruptive means to achieve political ends from time to time. This course seeks to provide students with grounding in the basic tools of understanding social protest and social movement. In addition to Hong Kong, cases will be drawn from many different countries—from the American civil rights movement to the 2007 democratic demonstrations in Burma, from Gandhi’s satyagraha (non-violent resistance) to the more recent “color revolutions” in Europe and Central Asia etc. Students will also learn about influential social movement leaders past and present, such as Martin Luther King, Gandhi, Mandela, Mao, Lech Walesa, Aung San Suu Kyi and more.

Eligibility: Students who have taken CCCH9009 are not allowed to take this course.

Assessment: 100% coursework

POLI3094. Political participation: why and how? (6 credits)

Why and how do people participate in politics? What are the channels through which people make their voices heard and interests represented? Why does political participation take different forms in different countries? Why is participation important for democracy to sustain and non-democracies to change? This course will examine the dynamics and patterns of political participation in both democratic and non-democratic societies. Topics will cover voting & election, political party, representative institution, public opinion, civic organization, mass media, lobbying, interest group and informal politics in democratic societies as well as the modes, scope and impact of political participation under non-democratic regimes.

Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination

POLI3095. Civil society and governance (6 credits)

The main objective of the course is to help students understand the concept of civil society, its historical circumstances and theoretical approaches, and the role of civil society in public governance. Topics include conceptions of civil society in the history of political thought and contemporary discourse; roles and impacts of civil society; trends of civil society development; theoretical approaches to civil society; social movements; legitimacy and accountability of civil society organizations; legal framework for civil society organizations, and the role of civil society in public governance.

Assessment: 60% coursework, 40% examination

POLI3097. Modernity and globalization (6 credits)

The concept of ‘modernity’ refers to a series of developments that transformed the world in the eighteenth and nineteenth centuries, such as the emergence of the modern state, democracy, capitalism and modern industry. The concept of ‘globalization’ refers to a series of similar dynamics in the late twentieth and early twenty-first centuries, such as the emergence of global governance, new forms of global trade and industry, and apparent transformations in cultures and societies. This module surveys some of the most important debates about modernity and globalization in social and political thought, addressing important questions such as: What does it mean to be ‘modern’? Is modernity a distinctively ‘Western’ experience? What is ‘globalization’? Is globalization a transformation or continuation of modernity? Does globalization mark the ‘triumph’ of the ‘West’?

Assessment: 100% coursework

POLI3098. Nonprofit management (6 credits)

This course is designed to advance students’ understanding of the management and operation of organizations in the nonprofit sector. In particular, it examines issues unique to the governance and administration of nonprofits, including board management, fundraising, philanthropy, nonprofit accounting and reporting, leadership, and network management. Students will learn both the theories and practical techniques required for an effective manager in nonprofit organizations.

Assessment: 60% coursework, 40% examination

POLI3103. Politics of the Global South (6 credits)

The course will introduce students to the main debates and to some of the basic concepts and skills used in the analysis of the politics of the Global South. The course will combine theoretical perspectives with case studies, and will focus on a series of issues relevant to understanding political processes in the Global South. The course will explore the genealogy of the “Third World” concept and its mutation into the “Global South”, historical processes of decolonization, and some of the political challenges facing the postcolonial world. Furthermore, lectures will cover topics such as development and modernization, migration and mobility, human security and political violence, environmental degradation and processes of urbanization, the emergence of global cities, and human rights and democratization.

Assessment: 60% coursework, 40% examination

POLI3110. Dilemmas of humanitarian intervention (6 credits)

To examine dilemmas of humanitarian intervention, the course looks not only at states but also at INGOs and the aid business, and not only at aid but also at wider forms of political engagement. It focuses on (a) the emergence of humanitarian intervention, (b) its contemporary nature, (c) success and failure, (d) moral challenges, and (e) ways forward. It requires small groups of course participants to select one developing country for in-depth study, both to deepen their learning and to build a platform for comparative analysis in class.

Note: Students who have taken CCGL9036 Dilemmas of humanitarian intervention are not allowed to take this course.

Assessment: 60% coursework, 40% examination.

POLI3113. On the ethics of violence (6 credits)

This course discusses issues like the ethics of self- defense, punishment, necessity justifications for violence, torture, war, revolution and terrorism. It will also show that the ethics of violence is fundamental for a proper understanding of certain basic problems and principles in political philosophy and in the organisation of human societies.

Assessment: 60% coursework, 40% examination

POLI3115. Politics and public opinion (6 credits)

What is public opinion? How does public opinion influence politics? Can political elites manipulate public opinion? This course guides students to critically think about the three questions with a comparative review of classic and frontier research on political behavior and political communication in both democratic and authoritarian contexts. Specifically, it examines how citizens form opinions, how public opinion may influence policymaking and political selection, and how politicians and the media may shape public opinion. Along the way, it introduces students to a variety of methods for the study of public opinion, including survey, survey/lab/field experiment, and content analysis.

Assessment: 100% coursework

POLI3116. Theories and practice of social leadership (6 credits)

The aim of this course is to give students a fundamental and practical understanding of social leadership. It is designed for students from a variety of backgrounds, cultures, and experiences in summer internships and extra-curricular activities. As society becomes increasingly diversified that calls for social innovation and requires high adaptability and contextual intelligence of social leaders, students need to be equipped with mindsets and skill-sets that cross over various sectors in public administration, business, society and the academia. The purpose of this course is to significantly increase students’ capacity to sustain the demands of leadership and to strengthen students’ ability to exercise both leadership and authority.

Assessment: 100% coursework

POLI3117. Special topics in public policy (6 credits)

This course will focus on some major topics in public policy. Specific titles and course descriptions are available in the department website.

Assessment: 60% coursework, 40% examination

POLI3118. Special topics in NGO studies (6 credits)

This course will focus on some major topics in NGOs studies. Specific titles and course descriptions are available in the department website.

Assessment: 100% coursework

POLI3119. Causes of international war (6 credits)

This course studies the causes of war. Competing theories of war are discussed; different methods of testing the theories are considered; and illustrative historical cases are examined, with a focus on East Asia. Also covered are the implications of nuclear weapons on international security, and the consequences of war on societies and individual human lives. This is an advanced course that includes a major research investigation project.

Note: Students who took POLI3076 in 2013-14 or 2014-15 are not allowed to take this course.

Assessment: 100% coursework

POLI3121. Environmental policy (6 credits)

This course aims to provide introduction into the principles of environmental policy. It introduces fundamental theories and basic principles applied to environmental policy analysis. This course will help students to understand how economic incentives originate environmental problems and what roles government and public policy play. This course continues with discussions on various environmental policy issues, including international issues and energy.

Students who are not physically present will not be allowed to take the course.

Eligibility: Students who took POLI3117 in 2014-15 are not allowed to take this course.

Assessment: 100% coursework

POLI3122. Strategic leadership in civil society organisations (6 credits)

This course is designed to advance students’ understanding of strategic leadership civil society organizations (CSOs). Strategic leadership involves interpreting the environment, crafting strategies, and building an organization that thrives in dynamic environments. A vibrant civil society calls for strategic leadership that goes beyond a single agency’s interest, is driven by a collective vision and drives social change. In addition to learning theories of strategic leadership, students will practice strategic thinking and gain a deeper understanding of development of strategies in response to challenges arising from changing social needs, growing demands for social services and collective action problems in service provision.

Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination

POLI3123. Politics of the two Koreas (6 credits)

This course examines political actors, processes, and issues in domestic politics and foreign relations of South and North Korea since 1945. It will begin with a brief overview of the shared historical origins of political institutions in the two Koreas, and move onto in-depth surveys about the divergent institutional, economic, and foreign relations paths that North and South Korea took after the Korean War. The third part of the course is devoted to the analysis about the contemporary inter-Korean relations, focusing on the causes and consequences of military tensions, nuclear crises, and various dialogues and cooperation initiatives since 1990. Lastly, it will discuss how the political and economic developments in the two Koreas affect and are influenced by the regional and international relations.

Eligibility: Students who have taken POLI3076 in 2015-16 are not allowed to take this course.

Assessment: 100% coursework

POLI3124. Justice and good life (6 credits)

This course explores some of the basic issues in the debate between liberal neutrality and state perfectionism, which are at the core of liberal political theory. These issues include: What should be the relationship between the good life and social justice? Should a liberal state pursue social justice but not any kind of human good, such as knowledge and art? Can there be any objective knowledge about the good life? Is state promotion of the good life necessarily unfair to people who live in many different ways? In addition, if you care about injustice and poverty, how come you are so rich (or you want to be rich)? We shall also discuss some of the theories of prominent philosophers including Wilhelm von Humboldt, Karl Marx, J.S. Mill, John Rawls, and Joseph Raz. The course aims to enhance students’ abilities to appreciate some of the main arguments in political theory and formulate their own views on a wide range of social and political issues. This is an advanced course in political theory. It is strongly recommended that students who want to take this course have already studied the gateway course “Introduction to political theory” and have a serious interest in political theory.

Eligibility: Students who took POLI3002 in 2016-17 are not allowed to take this course.

Assessment: 100% coursework

POLI3126. Politics of contemporary Japan (6 credits)

This course examines the politics of contemporary Japan. After a brief historical review, we survey the core political institutions of the postwar era, explore the interaction of political leaders, political parties, the bureaucracy and interest groups, with an emphasis on the ongoing transformation of the Japanese political system. We focus particularly on political changes since 1993, including the new electoral system and party realignment. Special attention is devoted to contemporary issues, such as foreign policy, economic policy, national security and administrative reform.

Eligibility: Students who took POLI3001 in 2015-16 or 2016-17 are not allowed to take this course.

Assessment: 60% coursework, 40% examination

POLI3127. The politics of the European Union (6 credits)

What is the EU? How does it work? And why does it matter? The EU is a unique experiment in transnational cooperation. It is neither a state nor an international organization, but it has characteristics of both. It promotes closer integration among its member states, while also trying to accommodate their diversity. It struggles to maintain external borders, while striving to remove internal borders. It seeks to establish a strong identity and role for itself in a world that is dominated by powerful states, such as the US and China. The EU today faces many challenges – making its study timely and relevant for anyone who wishes to understand global politics.
This course traces the development of the EU into a major economic and political actor in the 21st century. We will study the EU’s political structures, its process of enlargement and its foreign policy. We will also study some of the ongoing crises that threaten European unity, including the euro crisis, the refugee crisis, Brexit and the rise of populism.

Eligibility: students who took POLI3076 in 2016-17 are not allowed to take this course.

Assessment: 60% coursework, 40% examination

POLI3129. Foreign policy decision making (6 credits)

How do countries make decisions? What explains the foreign policy of states in the international system? This course examines the major theories of foreign policy decisions making including, rational choice, bureaucratic politics, group think as well as psychological and environmental factors that influence decision making in foreign policy. The various theoretical approaches are applied to historical case studies to test the empirical validity of different theories. A decision making simulation game will be used to help apply and understand the various models.

Eligibility: Students who took POLI3001 in 2017-18 are not allowed to take this course.

Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination

POLI3130. Latin American politics (6 credits)

This course is intended to act as an introduction and background to Latin America, with a view to understanding and interpreting the region’s increasing significance in contemporary global political and economic relations. For example, China’s growing interest in Latin America as a strategic and commercial partner.

Eligibility: Students who took POLI3077 in 2017-18 or before are not allowed to take this course.

Assessment: 100% coursework

POLI3131. In search of good policy: an introduction to policy evaluation (6 credits)

This course provides an introduction to rigorous policy evaluation methods. The main objective of this course is to familiarize students with a wide range of quantitative methods that are increasingly used to evaluate public policy and inform policy-making. Students will begin by reflecting on the interaction between statistics, policy analysis and decision-making. This will be followed by an introduction to the fundamental concepts underlying quantitative evaluation methods. The remainder of the course will focus on understanding the theory and application of policy evaluation methodologies, including randomized experiments, instrumental variable analysis, matching and difference-in-differences. Additional topics to be covered include mixed methods approaches, review and synthesis approaches, choice experiments, and the impact of big data on evaluation methods. By the end of the course, students will be able to fully engage with published studies using quantitative evaluation methods and to be able to draw out appropriate policy implications. This course does not require any pre-existing experience or training in mathematics or statistics.

Students who are not physically present will not be allowed to take the course.

Assessment: 100% coursework

POLI3132. Terrorism and political violence (6 credits)

While warfare between states has become quite infrequent, conflicts between governments and terrorist groups have increasingly developed into one of the predominant form of political violence. Indeed, long before the September 11, 2001 terrorist attacks, domestic (or transnational) terrorist groups have terrorized tens of millions of civilians and scores of countries around the world. Since the turn of the century, terrorist attacks have also become increasingly lethal and destructive in various ways. This course takes an actor-centered approach to the study of terrorism and political violence. It will address, among other things, the goals and origins of terrorist groups, the strategies that these non-state actors and governments use to combat each other, the effects that such groups can have upon the unfortunate countries in which they operate (as well as on other countries unfortunate enough to suffer from any ‘spillovers’) and the various ways that these conflicts eventually end. As we explore these issues, we will also acquire in-depth historical knowledge of the history of terrorism in general and of a wide range of terrorist groups in particular.

Assessment: 50% coursework, 50% examination

POLI3133. Contemporary Southeast Asian politics (6 credits)

This course is a survey of contemporary politics in Southeast Asia, with a focus on political transformations in the region since the Cold War. The course provides a historically grounded approach to understand the formation of Southeast Asian states as well as the contemporary dynamics of political changes in the region. It starts by reviewing the impact of colonialism and historical trajectories in the region. We then delve deep into specific Southeast Asian countries, overviewing key political events and important leaders, tracing logics of political contestation, and providing a foundation to understand the structures of governments. After the specific country studies, we will focus on a few specific issues and challenges pertaining to the region, such as economic development, political regimes and governance, and regionalization and ASEAN.

Eligibility: Students who took POLI3076 in 2018-19 are not allowed to take this course.

Assessment: 100% coursework

POLI3134. Politics and security on the Korean Peninsula (6 credits)

This course discusses various political and security issues in the Korean Peninsula. The course begins with the ongoing Korean denuclearization negotiations involving two Koreas, the United States and China. Then it traces the origins of the Korean conflict back to the Korean liberation from Japanese colonial rule, the 1950-53 Korean War, and the emergence of the Republic of Korea and the Democratic People’s Republic of Korea. Then it examines how the two countries diverged politically, economically and culturally for the past several decades. Then it comes back to current issues: nuclear proliferation in the Korean Peninsula, prospects for Korean unification, and Korea’s relations with its neighbors. Towards the end of the class, students will conduct a policy exercise simulating the denuclearization negotiations, which will help them develop policymaking skills.

Eligibility: Students who took POLI3077 in 2018-19 are not allowed to take this course.

Assessment: 70% coursework, 30% examination

POLI3135/ENVS3402. Qualitative data, social science methods and decision-making in environmental science (6 credits)

The course is designed to help students understand the interdisciplinary nature of environmental sciences and the approaches, methodologies and methods used by researchers. Students will engage in these approaches themselves, discuss benefits and limitations of various study designs, the philosophical underpinnings of studies, how they are related to concepts of “bias” and “subjectivity vs. objectivity”, particularly as environmental science using approaches from both natural and social sciences. Students will also be expected to discuss implementation of the methods and methodologies covered and their challenges, the role of the researcher in environmental science, data collection and the data produced. In studying this course, the students are expected to develop critical thinking skills that will allow them to evaluate different approaches, methods and analyses used in environmental science and decision making in environmental science.

Pre-requisite: ENVS2002 Environmental data analysis or POLI2104 Research methods in politics and public administration

Assessment: 60% coursework, 40% examination

POLI3136. The politics of international law (6 credits)

How does international law affect international politics? When and why do states (and other actors) take international law seriously? The study of international relations often emphasises the rule of power. However, in this course, we will focus on the power of rules. The course has two aims. Firstly, to introduce students to the concept of international law - what it is, how it is made, and how it is enforced. Secondly, to analyse key issues in contemporary international relations, including human rights, the use of force, international criminal justice, and state secession. Taking specific cases, such as the NATO intervention in Libya, Russia’s annexation of Crimea, and the civil war in Syria, we will examine the challenges of building an international order that is both just and stable. This course offers an introduction to international law to students of politics and international relations. No prior study of law or international law is required. Upon completion of the course, students will have a deep understanding of how international law works (and doesn’t work) in the real world.

Eligibility: Students who took POLI3001 in 2019-20 are not allowed to take this course.

Assessment: 60% coursework, 40% examination

POLI3137. Nationalism: theories and practices (6 credits)

Why is nationalism such an appealing force in the world? What is the source of nationalism? What are the bases of a national identity? Is self-determination a justified cause for full statehood? This course is to provide students with an understanding of the major contemporary theories of nationalism, the most prominent explanations to the reemergence of nationalism across the world. In the first half of the course, we will discuss the conceptualization of understanding the social phenomena, examine the related key concepts, including nation, state, ethnicity, nationalism, and national identity, and provide students with the background knowledge and tools to analyze how social and political changes affect the future of nationalism. Students will be exposed to a wide range of literature in political science that engages in the theoretical debates. In the second half of the course, we will focus on the effects of nationalism on political identities, voting, patterns of political violence, and immigration policy, by exploring cases from around the world. Students will also have the opportunity to build perspectives to understand and examine how contemporary political changes are affected by nationalism and its variant forms through various assignments.

Assessment: 100% coursework

POLI3138. Institutional analysis for reform (6 credits)

Public policies and management do not take place in a vacuum. It is essential for public managers to possess a good awareness and understanding of their embedded political context. The course applies various institutional approaches to understand systematically the political-institutional structures and processes in which public policies and management are practiced and major reforms take place. The course will draw on theories and practices developed by both academics and practitioners as its learning resources. This is an advanced undergraduate–level course. Students are strongly recommended to complete one of the following introductory courses (e.g., POLI2104, POLI2105, POLI2106, POLI2107, or POLI2108) before taking this course.

Eligibility: Students who have taken POLI3024 in 2019-20 or 2020-21 are not allowed to take this course.

Assessment: 100% coursework

POLI3139. The United Nations and global governance (6 credits)

This survey course is designed for third-year undergraduate students with a rigorous introduction to the theoretical perspectives and main debates regarding the largest international institution, the United Nations, with a specific focus on peace and security issues. The course is rooted in the International Relations scholarship regarding international organizations and addresses questions of i) What do international organizations actually do in global governance? ii) Can the United Nations promote international cooperation on peace and security issues? iii) Can theory inform us about the actual day-to-day of how international organizations work? The course is structured in three parts. First, we will get settled into the course, understanding more about the International Relations debates and theoretical approaches about ‘international organizations’ and key UN bodies. Second, we tackle ongoing peace and security issues on the UN agenda, which affect global governance today. Third, we bring the theory back down to earth using an advanced simulation in the final section of the course.

Assessment: 100% coursework

POLI3140. International development (6 credits)

The developing world has been highly marginalized yet strategically critical in international politics throughout modern history. This course examines the intersection of international politics and development in three parts: the major development bottlenecks faced by developing countries; the role of powerful states and international institutions in the developing world; and several new frontiers in international development including the rise of “emerging donors”, Chinese development finance, and the effects of pandemics on global development. The course will familiarize students with a wide range of political science, economics, history, and other social science research on global development. It will also introduce students to a diverse set of conceptual and methodological research approaches in political science and international relations.

Assessment: 100% coursework

POLI3141. Punishment and political theory (6 credits)

One of the fundamental issues in political theory concerns when the vast coercive power of the state can be permissibly used against its citizens. There is arguably no greater use of state coercion than the practice of punishment. In this course, we will focus on three central questions. First, why should we punish criminal offenders? Second, how should we punish them? Third, who should be punished? The first question raises the following problem of punishment. It is typically thought to be wrong to inflict harm. Yet, when someone commits a crime, it also often thought we should harm him through punishment. We should ask then, why is it permissible to treat offenders differently to innocent persons? We will consider retributivist, deterrence, and rehabilitation theories to address this problem of punishment. Following this, we will examine which methods of punishment are permissible, and desirable. One commonly used form of punishment is incarceration. However, it is often argued to be ineffective, costly, and inhumane. As a result, there is an increasing interest in harnessing neuroscientific advances as alternative methods of punishing offenders. For example, drugs, deep brain stimulation, and brain computer interfaces all have the potential to reduce or control violent dispositions. Such neuropunishments are potentially more effective, less costly, and more humane alternatives to incarceration. Are these punishments permissible? The final question addresses who should be punished. We will consider important questions concerning the permissibility punishing of innocent persons. Developments in neuroscience might help us predict who is likely to commit an offence in future, which raises the spectre of enabling ‘prepunishment’ before an offense is committed. Could this be morally justified?

Assessment: 100% coursework

POLI3142. Democratization (6 credits)

Since the 1970s, many countries in Europe, Latin America, Asia and Africa have transformed from authoritarian to democratic regimes. Studies show that from 1975 to 2005, there was a threefold increase in the number of democratic countries. On the other hand, many newly democratized countries have reverted back to hybrid regime or full authoritarianism. Other countries have attempted but failed to democratize altogether. Why have some countries succeeded in democratization while others failed? Among those that succeeded, how did democratization occur? What are the crucial factors affecting democratic consolidation? For those that persist as hybrid regimes, what are their characteristics and what explains their endurance? This course will examine these issues critically through both generalized discussion of the structural, institutional, and societal factors affecting democratization as well as country-based studies.

Eligibility: Students who have taken POLI3077 in 2019-20 or 2020-21 are not allowed to take this course.

Assessment: 100% coursework

POLI3143. Politics of global inequality (6 credits)

This class explores several questions on the causes and consequences of economic inequality. Why have some countries grown rich while others have not? Why are some societies more economically equal than others? Is material inequality the only type of inequality? Why does inequality even matter? We address these questions by drawing on insights from a variety of disciplines including economics, political science, psychology, sociology, and others to examine the sources of inequality and what can be done about it.

Assessment: 100% coursework

POLI3144. Early Confucian political philosophy (6 credits)

This course provides a comprehensive analytical introduction to early (pre-Qin) Confucian political thought, which had significantly shaped the nature and development of politics and political culture in China till the collapse of Qing. The course selects themes and ideas primarily from four classical texts, The Book of History, The Analects, Mencius, and Xunzi. Topics include the concept of Heaven; conceptions of human nature; virtues and the good life; the aims and methods of politics; the nature and justification of political authority; the political roles of the people, the ruler and the literati; distributive justice and social welfare; protests and dissents; the morality of war.

Assessment: 100% coursework

POLI3145. Contemporary Confucian political philosophy (6 credits)

Confucianism as an ancient tradition of thought has fundamentally shaped Chinese culture and deeply influenced East Asian societies for many centuries. Today, many people in China and around the globe still explore the contemporary relevance of Confucianism, and contemporary Confucian political philosophy is emerging as a vibrant field of thought. The course studies how major contemporary works in Confucian political philosophy respond to modern political issues such as the state’s promotion of the good life, democracy, individual freedom, human rights, and social justice.

Assessment: 100% coursework

POLI3146. Making sense of Economics (6 credits)

Economics shapes our world. Its theories and the assumptions underlying them inform policymaking in almost every sphere of life. The way economics is often understood, however, is that it is akin to a science. That is, there is only one correct answer and its best left to the experts. This course takes as its starting point the belief that every student of politics needs to learn some economics. Students need to be aware of different types of economic arguments and learn to engage critically with each argument to understand what makes the most sense in each circumstance, and in light of which political goals and moral values. The course will begin with an overview of the history of economic thought (e.g. how did we get here?). We will then focus on the dominant neo-classical school of economics, where we will learn key theories and the assumptions underlying them (e.g. textbook knowledge). We will proceed to learn about other schools of economic thought, including the Classical School, the Marxist School, the Developmentalist Tradition, the Austrian School, the (Neo-)Schumpeterian School, the Keynesian School, The Institutionalist School, and the Behaviouralist School. Finally, students will learn ‘how to do’ economics by applying the analytical insights from the different schools of economic thought to a range of real-world issues, including economic output, finance, inequality and poverty, work and unemployment, the environment, and the role of the state.

Assessment: 100% coursework

POLI3147. Behavioural public policy (6 credits)

Behavioural science uses insights from economics and psychology to understand how people behave rather than how we would like them to behave. These findings carry important implications for the evaluation and design of public policy. In this course, students will first understand the complexity inherent in using scientific findings in the design and evaluation of public policy. Students will proceed to examine the theoretical foundations of behavioural public policy, with a particular focus on prospect theory. Using real-world examples taken from health, education, environment etc., students will engage with key insights that have emerged from behavioural science and think through how they may be relevant to public policy. Students will then be encouraged to formulate their own thoughts regarding the ethics of behavioural public policy using Nudge Theory as a vehicle to do so. Finally, students will apply behavioural insights to both evaluate and design public policy.

Students who are not physically present will not be allowed to take the course.

Assessment: 100% coursework

POLI3148. Data science in politics and public administration (6 credits)

Big data play increasingly important roles in politics and public administration. This course aims to help future PPA practitioners and researchers make sense of big data. It guides students to ask and answer the following questions: What are big data? With big data, what questions can policymakers and researchers ask and answer? How to collect and analyze big data? This course introduces students to state-of-the-art data science techniques. Topics include introductory programming for data science, data collection, data visualization, and machine learning. Upon completion, students are expected to get hands-on experience with data science and understand the promise, limitations, and pitfalls of big data in politics and public administration.

Pre-requisite: POLI2104 Research methods in politics and public administration

Assessment: 100% coursework

POLI4046.Thesis in politics and public administration (12 credits, 100% coursework)

This is a two-semester project catered for highly motivated students that are interested in graduate studies and research careers. The course should be taken during the senior year under the supervision of a faculty member. The thesis should be at least 10,000 words long and individually written. It is expected to be a substantive piece of scholarship that demonstrates critical reflections and original research findings on a topic agreed by the supervisor. Students must have achieved a cumulative GPA of at least 3.5. They should submit a research proposal to their intended supervisor and secure the latter’s agreement to supervise their thesis before enrolling in the course.

Assessment: 100% coursework.

POLI4110. Advanced seminar I (6 credits)

This is a discussion-based course for senior year students with strong academic interest in specialized and in-depth study of one or more topics in a small class setting. The topical focus of the seminar will depend on the area specialty of the instructor. Students are expected to read intensively and contribute fruitfully to seminar discussions.

Assessment: 100% coursework

POLI4111. Advanced seminar II: Advanced Seminar on Strategy and Politics (6 credits)

This is an advanced seminar that studies strategy and strategic thinking. It analyzes strategies from both theoretical and historical perspectives, using both real-world cases and analytical models, applied across both international and domestic politics. It also covers institutional strategies and the grand strategy of great powers. The seminar is for advanced students with strong academic interest in specialized and in-depth study in a small class setting. Students are expected to read intensively and contribute fruitfully to seminar discussions.

Students who are not physically present will not be allowed to take the course.

Prerequisite: POLI2104

Eligibility: For Year 3 or above students only

Assessment: 100% coursework

POLI4112. Advanced seminar III (6 credits)

This is a discussion-based course for senior year students with strong academic interest in specialized and in-depth study of one or more topics in a small class setting. The topical focus of the seminar will depend on the area specialty of the instructor. Students are expected to read intensively and contribute fruitfully to seminar discussions.

Assessment: 100% coursework

POLI4113. Advanced seminar IV (6 credits)

This is a discussion-based course for senior year students with strong academic interest in specialized and in-depth study of one or more topics in a small class setting. The topical focus of the seminar will depend on the area specialty of the instructor. Students are expected to read intensively and contribute fruitfully to seminar discussions.

Assessment: 100% coursework

POLI4114. Advanced seminar in international politics (6 credits)

This seminar exposes students to the canon and cutting edge of theory and research in international politics. We will cover core topics, such as strategy, signaling, and domestic-international dynamics. The core topics not only represent the central coordinates of International Relations (IR), but also make deeper connections to other subfields such as Comparative Politics and Political Economy, and to other social sciences such as Sociology and Economics. Beyond the core topics, we will also cover topics of research interest to students, as chosen by students. This seminar is for students with strong academic interest in specialized and in-depth study in a small class setting. Students are expected to read intensively and contribute fruitfully to seminar discussions.

Pre-requisites: POLI2104 Research methods in politics and public administration, and one PPA course in international politics.
Eligibility: Students who have taken POLI4110 in 2020-21 are not allowed take this course.

Assessment: 100% coursework

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Advanced courses

ECON2276. State, law and the economy (6 credits)

Please refer to the School of Economics and Finance website for course description.

EUST3010. European political and economic institutions and processes (6 credits)

Please refer to the European Studies Programme website for course description.

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Faculty-level Courses

Introductory course

SINO1003. Greater China: A multi-disciplinary introduction (6 credits)

This course adopts multi-disciplinary perspectives to examine significant and complex issues of China in the past and present. With a general survey of China, this course discusses China’s historical development, revolutionary past, cultural traditions, formal political structure, the market-oriented economic reform, and geographic, demographic and linguistic diversity, as well as contemporary issues of environment, resistance and mass media. Central themes throughout the course include China’s cultural identity, ethnicity, state-society relations, continuities and changes in China’s socio-political values, and China’s role in the global order. The purpose of this course is to provide students with a base of knowledge of China’s historical and contemporary experiences and contexts. It aims to help students understand how China’s historical legacy impacted on today’s society, and how contemporary politics and economics transformed China in a comprehensive way.

Note: Students who have taken SINO1001 and SINO1002 are not allowed to take this course.

Assessment: 100% coursework

Advanced course

SINO2003. Contemporary China studies: issues and perspectives (6 credits)

This course examines and unravels the key features and outcomes of China’s experiences/ model in reforms and development. After introductorylectures on the macro-development framework, students are required to form project groups and select key issues for presentations in a series of research seminars. Under the guidance of the courseteacher, project groups are expected to make investigation and data search on the selected issues. Current and emerging specific political, economic, and social issues/ phenomena may include: globalization and the Chinese economy, environmental protection, income disparity and poverty, civil service reform and corruption, population mobility and migrant workers, human resources and employment, regional development (Pearl River Delta), civil society, rural development, protest movements and social unrest, and various dimensions of integration in Greater China. Guest lecturers may be invited to participate in research seminars.

Assessment: 100% coursework

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